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Al Jazeera America
Oct 18, 2013 7:30pm EDT
competitive in science and engineering? our digital producer is here, and he's bringing all of your live feedback into the program. america was the first and only country to put a machine on the moon, and now people are concerned we're behind in technology. >> we have given america the cronut. alejandro says: christina gave us a different stat. viewers at home, you are the third hosts of the show, and all of your comments shape and drive this discussion. so give us a comment and we'll try our best to get it on the air. >> science and technology drives the global marketplace, but is america prepared to meet that and stay competitive? countries like china are catching up, in as soon as and technology and math. and you'll hear that a lot in the show tonight. in the u.s., 38% of young adults who start off majoring in fields graduate with something completely different, and those who do for tend to be white and mail. women account for 18% of the field. and blacks and latinos make up only 12%. so has the u.s. lost it's passion for science and technology or do we need a more innovative way to r
Al Jazeera America
Oct 19, 2013 12:30pm EDT
keeping america competitive in science and engineering? our digital producer is here, and he's bringing all of your live feedback into the program. america was the first and only country to put a machine on the moon, and now people are concerned we're behind in technology. >> we have given america the cronut. alejandro says: christina gave us a different stat. viewers at home, you are the third hosts of the show, and all of your comments shape and drive this discussion. so give us a comment and we'll try our best to get it on the air. >> science and technology drives the global marketplace, but is america prepared to meet that and stay competitive? countries like china are catching up, in as soon as and technology and math. and you'll hear that a lot in the show tonight. in the u.s., 38% of young adults who start off majoring in fields graduate with something completely different, and those who do for tend to be white and mail. women account for 18% of the field. and blacks and latinos make up only 12%. so has the u.s. lost it's passion for science and technology or do we need a more in
MSNBC
Oct 23, 2013 1:00am EDT
fast acting advil. look for it in the white box. >> in tonight's rewrite, science vs. politics. we have in one of our political party today a significant group of science deniers. their argument not just with climate science but subjects like evolution. republican candidates for president are unharmed and republican presidential primaries if they offer full throated denunciations of the theory of evolution. it wasn't all ways this way. 50 years ago today here in washington at 4:00 in the afternoon, president kennedy went to constitution hall to give a speech to the national academy of sciences. it was an era when government support of science and enthusiasm for science was utterly uncontroversial. the american space program was thrilling the world by rocketing astronauts from cape canaveral out into space where they circled the globe in tiny capsules. an era when the science adviser to the president, dr. jerome wisner was as prominent as a cabinet member. he went on to become the president of mit. when he died at age 79, in 1994, the first fact reported in his "the new york times" obitu
ABC
Oct 17, 2013 11:35pm PDT
>>> dicky: from hollywood, it's "jimmy kimmel live!" tonight, kerry washington, "science bob" pflugfelder, this week in unnecessary censorship, and music from sleigh bells. with cleto and the cletones. and now, hold fast, here's jimmy kimmel! ♪ ♪ [ cheers and applause ] >> jimmy: thank you very much. welcome to the show. thank you for watching. thank you for coming to my house. [ applause ] i appreciate that. can you feel the government running again? the government shut down officially ended last night. should we be happy the government is sfwhback? i feel like my sister got back together with an abusive boyfriend or something. here is an interesting fact -- not a single real housewife knew about the government shut down. i'm still not entirely clear on what happened. as far as i know president obama signed a bill to redo the ceiling at the capitol building and now the zoo is open again. the national zoo in washington, d.c. opens back up tomorrow. but their famous panda-cam is operational. because of budget cuts they had to shut the panda-cam down. i think it just went b
Al Jazeera America
Oct 18, 2013 8:00pm EDT
had kept the animals fed during shutdown. the shutdown would have a last being effect on science and nature. mary woolly is the head of the largest national health and research foundation. what are some of the most critical programs affected? >> there's certainly more than one. when science signs is shut down and we put it on ice it will have ramifications that will last for a long time. think about ice and you think about antarctica, right? science in antarctica has lost almost a whole season of opportunity because this is the time when research on biology on earth sciences on astronomy, on species, including one species of penguin, could not go forward. we don't know how much could not go forward thip. science is not something you can ask nature to go back and do it over again, it's 24/seven, we've missed out and on quite a lot. government was shut down? alzheimer's wasn't shut down, cancer wasn't shut down, diabetes wasn't shut down. and a lot of the research that is going to give us answers, that trouble every family in this country, everybody around the world has setback in ways
Al Jazeera America
Oct 16, 2013 1:30pm EDT
science by scientists. let's check out our team of hard-core nerds. tonight she's on the front lines of a devastating wildfire as a drone takes command of the skies over yosemite. crystal is a molecular neuroscience. she goes to the streets of seattle and santa cruz for a look at how science might stop crime before it happens. lindsay is an ex-cia operator. tonight she shows us how mushrooms might one day replace styrofoam packages. i'm phil torres and i'm an entomologist. i study insects in the rain forests of peru. that's our team. now, let's do some science. >>> it has been another fantastic week of science on the road. we've got crystal, lindsay and rita here. we're going to start with you. you were basically a very high-tech firefighter for a week. tell me about this. >> that's right. i was on a story that followed how we use unmanned aircraft to fight the rim fire at yosemite. let me show you. here it is. it's a very unusual-looking piece of technology. it almost looks like an alien insect, and they have it in a hangar. essentially they fly it up to yosemite, and it's eyes in t
Al Jazeera America
Oct 21, 2013 1:30pm EDT
air? that's our team. now let's do some science. >> hi guys welcome back to another week of techknow where we're going to show you some pretty fun innovations in science. i'm here with marita and rachelle. hi, nasa seekers mission, this is a gc-8, loaded with millions of dollars of equipment measuring the air as we're flying through the gulf. it was a pretty incredible experience. let's take a look. ists 7:30 in the morning and -- it's 7:30 in the morning. and hangar 9 is buzzing with excitement. >> any last questions about what we're going to be doing today? save jet. >> from a distance our plane looks like any other. but close up you can see it's anything but. i'm minutes away from boarding this plain with nasa experimentalists. it is a nasa gc-8, trying to measure the pollution and the atmosphere. it's a three pronged attack. the signs of the tc 8, after the u 2 spy plane. the er 2 application is a sight to see. everything about it has the feeling of a flight to space. the men who fly the plane undergo special training and wear a pressurized flight soot. several weather p
CSPAN
Oct 20, 2013 9:00pm EDT
religion and embrace of science and the secular world. this program is about an hour. >> host: richard i can't help but notice and admire your tie which has pangolins. was there a significance to that? >> guest: it was handpainted by my wife as all of my ties are. this is a one off tie. nothing else like it in the world. we went to antarctic last christmas on a cruise and we spent christmas on the boat in an arctic so this was like christmas present. >> host: to you have a particular interest in pangolins? >> guest: they are astonishing animals the way they fly in the water. they look clumsy on land. then they get under water and they are dirt. the streamlining is beautiful. and so, like dolphins they are astonishingly fast. and they jumped out of the border and back in again in a dolphin like way. >> host: you're first big success was the selfish gene and then forgot the delusion that need to the controversy will figure. then along with christopher hitchens and daniel benet you need the word atheist acceptable i think before that people were ashamed to say they were an atheist or embarr
CSPAN
Oct 19, 2013 10:05am EDT
reading. he read a lot of history. he created new discipline in this country, political science. he read a lot about politics, government, economics, history, and how they were melded into this new thing called political science. and after wilson realized he was not making a living as an attorney in atlanta he decided he was going to go to graduate school. one very good thing came out of his atlanta years and that was he had one big piece of business as a lawyer, and that was something that his family had thrown to him. there was some piece of property that needed some contracts done, legal work. so he went to georgia where he was tying up loose ends and where he, a presbyterian ministers son met a woman named ellen lou erickson who was a presbyterian ministers daughter. the two of them fell in love and had a real old-fashioned 19th century court should. a little more extensive than most because wilson, although he was desperate to marry her realize did not have the resources to do it just yet. they had an engagement that went on for several years during which time they exchanged thousands
CSPAN
Oct 20, 2013 1:15pm EDT
professor. >> what did you teach? >> the philosophy of science. would ask them, if you want to give a new function on your computer. we were talking a lot about the information. and they would immediately give up the techie generation. a program, construction, software, all of which are correct answers. well, it turns out that the same thing is true in life. if you want to generate life in the first place, you have to have affirmation in the form of dna, proteins that make life bible. you want to build a new form of life, and this is the darling is trying to do, try to explain, you also have to have actually been some digital code. you need tissues, organs, their for new types of cells. each new type of cell, new protein, the proteins require information. so the cambrian explosion is not just an explosion of new forms of structure, new animals but an explosion of affirmation, of digital code and other forms of biological information. and what i show in the book is that natural selection and random mutation is a singularly inept mechanism for generating new information. mutation came
CSPAN
Oct 19, 2013 10:00pm EDT
of them are about science but the science they are about implies atheism and it's sort of in played in them. this book is about my early life in the childhood school days university life and early career. so i suppose i just wanted to that tell the story of my life. there is a story of how i lost religious faith but it doesn't dominate nor should it. >> host: do you find -- i know wherever you go and there are crowds and q&a and people always want to ask you questions about religion and the universe and why are we here in the meaning of life. are you tired of that? >> guest: what i think we didn't do and people tell me in the book signings which are very gratifying they tell me that the god delusion gave them the courage to come out and in some cases it converted them but in rather more cases bear really where atheist and it gave them the courage to came out which suggests to me that they're a hell of a lot more atheists in this country than anybody realizes and it's the emperors new clothes effect but no one speaks out and says they are an atheist and yet if enough of them that the
FOX Business
Oct 19, 2013 2:00am EDT
science, and this is a way to get kids interested in that. tell us how numbers contribute to weather forecasting. >> well, it's all about computer models. what we input into the models to tell us what the forecast is going to bring, numbers, temperatures, drop in pressure, barometer. numbers are important when it comes to forecasting, and there's a lot of math, and this is a lot of science. we know as we get kids into schools these days if they're going to compete on the world stage, they have to know math, science, technology and engineering. so those two, math and science, that's what meteorology is all about. so if we can get them interested at a young age and think it's fun, maybe they'll in turn think that math and science is cool -- gerri: become an engineer, meteorologist, who knows? you know, the job openings, this is numbers from 2016, 16% of bachelor degrees will specialize in s.t.e.m., but the number of jobs that are open, one million. so we're not producing enough kids to actually do these jobs. anything we can do to inspire them is a positive, right? >> yeah, of course.
CSPAN
Oct 21, 2013 12:00am EDT
many i have written 10 books after the selfish gene and it is all about science but the science fair about is pretty much implying the fiesta. this book is about my early life. university life so i suppose i just wanted to tell the story of my life if anybody is interested how i lost religious faith is in there but it should not dominate. >> host: where ever you go. people always want to ask questions about the universe and the meaning of life. are you tired of that? >> guest: making a theism respectable i don't think it is that exactly but what we did do in the book people tell me that the grand illusion gave them the courage to come out and in some cases it converted them but otherwise the already were atheists the gate and the courage to come out that suggests there are a helluva lot more than anybody realizes. white the emperor new clothes you fact that nobody actually speaks out but enough of them did then suddenly they all would with the tipping point the fact. >> host: you were talking members of congress out about a fall 535 members there's only one that claims not to be a be
CSPAN
Oct 20, 2013 10:00am EDT
come i don't have any background in computer science or math. i actually avoided all math and somehow to get through college without taking any of it and didn't pass calculus. so the answer to that is really simple. it is the book captivated me not for the mass and not for some of the more moments obtain a fact that because of what he accomplished. if you asked me to explain algorithms today, i can give you a very broad explanation, but i still can't tell you what is at the heart of them. people who work with him still can't come as some of them. so it just gives you an idea of just how incredible the math wiz behind what i'm going to tell you a little bit about. so the story of danny lewin is a complex one. at first i found really difficult to capture in a character study and as a writer. i'm just going to read a little bit from the preface of the book to that will give you an idea of these seemingly disparate parts of his life and what made the story in some ways for me, stranger than fiction. danny story at the leap from the very beginning was almost more unbelievable than
WHUT
Oct 23, 2013 7:00am EDT
talking to us here on "gmt ." with me now as our science editor. quite a story, david. and the risk -- and let's not forget. there are real risks. >> real risks. and they are volunteers put extraordinary, i have not heard before, high school students also joining in. i think the impact on a small community of this kind of event can be utterly devastating. i saw for myself in the summer and arizona, a very similar forest fire where -- in arizona, a very similar forest fire, where the great challenge is unpredictability, because of the wind. if it changes direction the firefighting teams can get caught -- >> 19 -- >> 19 firefighters, all volunteers, all from a small town like the one where we have just been reporting from the suddenly got caught up because the wind shifted, and they all died. precariousy existence. and it is made possible through the extraordinary goodwill of volunteers. >> a science editor, what i want to ask you, the science behind this. we talk about climate change. you have the prime minister tony abbott saying this had nothing to do with climate change. what do y
PBS
Oct 15, 2013 5:30pm EDT
days of having to go to the science theater to see a movie is ancient history. we take a look at some of the options. >> gravity was one of the biggest movies of the weekend, raking in over $55 million at the box office. with lots of 3d imax screenings, it was literally the biggest movie of the weekend playing on extra large screens across the country. several movie goers paid extra to see it. the film's director said east max inspired him when making the movie. >> i can't see you anymore. >> but there are two different kinds of imax screens and chances are you saw gravity on the not so good kind. when you think imax, you think giant screens, screens that are several stories tall. over the last several years imax has been slapping their names on screens that are slightly bigger than a traditional screen instead of building them specifically like the ones at science centers, they're retrofitting existing theaters. critics call these lie max but they make up the bulk of them. for example, there are nine imax theaters in arizona but only three are the big ones and only one shows mainstre
CSPAN
Oct 19, 2013 7:00pm EDT
science. i avoided all math and got through college without taking any of it and didn't pass calculous and the answer to that is simple. it's that the book captivated me enough for the math and not for some of the more sensational moments of the life, but because of the story and what he accomplished, and if you ask me to explain the algorithms today, i can give you a broad explanation, but i can't tell you what's at the heart of them, and people who worked with him or work at the company today still can't, some of them. that gives you an idea how incredible the math was behind what i'm going to tell you a little bit about. so the story of danny really is a come flex one. he had all facets in life that i found difficult to capture in a character study and as a writer, and i'm just going to read a little bit from the preface of the book because that gives you an idea of the seemingly desperate parts of his life and what made the story in some ways for me saying truth is stranger than fiction, and danny's story i believed from the very beginning was more unbelievable than fiction. in the
CSPAN
Oct 17, 2013 11:00pm EDT
businesses with the best science and technology so they can compete with companies rom other countries. it plays a key role in keeping our food and our toys and our workplaces safe. it helps folks rebuild after a storm. it conserves our natural resources, it finances startups. it helps sell our products overseas. it provides security to our iplomats abroad. so let's work together to make government work better. instead of treating it like an enemy or purposely making it ork worse. that's not what the founders of this nation envisioned when they gave us the gift of self-government. you don't like a particular policy or a particular president, then argue for your position. go out there and win an election. push to change it but don't reak it. don't break what our predecessors spent over two enturies building. that's not being faithful to what this country's about. and that brings me to one last point. i've got a simple message for all the dedicated and patriotic federal workers who worked without pay or been forced off the job without pay, including most of my own staff. thank you. thanks fo
CSPAN
Oct 17, 2013 5:00pm EDT
an eye oas anyone on that. it has to be about data, about science, science. he had four words to describe which dominated the table for our domestic agenda, for our national agenda, it would be science, science, science, and science. science -- that means knowledge, data, evidence, about how the air we breathe, water we drink him about how we grow the economy, and that is about investments in science and technology. it is about the health of our thetry's investments in life sciences, national institutes of health. science is an answer to our prayers, but for some reason some in their caucus that it is one or the other, science or faith -- no, no, and science to defend our country with the best technology possible. so when we say we are not going to invest in education and we are going to cost -- reduced our investments in the national science of foundation and national institutes of health, we are doing a great disservice to our country. in every way, evidence, science, a, let's know what we are talking about. we would all say we can proceed down this path if we all stipulate to
CSPAN
Oct 17, 2013 9:00pm EDT
eye as anyone on that. so it has to be about data, it has to be about science. science. we had four words that dominate our domestic agenda, national agenda, it would be science, science, science, and science. science, that means knowledge, data, evidence about how the air we breathe and water we drink, evidence about how we grow our economy through through innovation and entrepreneurial spirit and that's about investments in science and technology. it's about the health of our country, it's about investments in life sciences. science is an answer to our prayers but some in their caucus seem to think it's one or the other, science or faith. no, no. science to defend our country, with the best technology possible. when we say we're not going to invest in education, redeuce our deficits, slow the rate of growth of the national science foundation or the national institutes of health, we are doing a grave disservice to our country. so in every way, evidence, science, data, let's know what we're talking about. then again, i, hen back to not that long ago when we would be negotiating with
CNBC
Oct 15, 2013 3:30am EDT
science and clinical research. this little capsule can not only help promote overall health. it may help reduce the incidence of certain cancer. it can even help improve our cognitive function, improve our memory, and help us stay able to access everything that's stored in our brains. are you ready to take charge of your health? [ applause ] thank you. and welcome to the new "living well with montel." you know, today we're talking about the vital role supplements play in our health. supplements have been around for a long time. the problem is most of them were formulated more than 50 years ago, and a lot has changed in a half a century. now, would you really want to use something that's 50 years old? you wouldn't rely on a 50-year-old car, or you wouldn't want to watch tv on something this old, right? or what about a cellphone? would you rather use this one or one like this? the answer's obvious. so, why would you trust your health to a 50-year-old supplement that might be doing you more harm than good? we're about to show you some surprising discoveries science has made in the last
Al Jazeera America
Oct 18, 2013 1:30pm EDT
this is really cool. that's our team, now let's do some science. [♪ music ] >> hi, guys, we are back here at "techknow" for another week of amazing stories and screen and innovation. we'll get started with this "heart in a box." check it out, this is an actual beating heart outside of the body. this is seriously the most amazing thing i've ever seen and touched. let's check out the story. >> when it comes to heart transplants, it's always a race against time. we've all seen it on tv. when a donor heart becomes available, medical teams must move quickly. the organ is removed and preserved by placing it in ice. the heart must arrive at the recipient's hospital within six hours that's because the ice damages the heart making it unfit for transplant. in this will keep hearts warm and beating. this will be a major break through in transplant history. the first human transatlantic took place in a hospital in south africa in 1967. since then it has become a fairly routine proceed cur proch 2,000 happening in the united states. there is one aspect to the process that has remained the same. y
WETA
Oct 15, 2013 6:30pm EDT
. christian science. is that, is that that thing all them gaybo hollywood actors do to keep their stuff away from other guys' butts? don't you understand? scotty needs help. and he'll get it... through faith. that's right. we will heal him with the power of prayer. y-you can't just let them just walk out of here! oh, i think they'll be back. are those their keys? no, they're my keys. and they said because of their faith, they don't believe in medicine. mom, i think there's a lot of religions that do that. well, that may be, meg, but that poor little baby has cancer, and they're just gonna take him home and pray over him?! well, that's what they do. they believe that disease is just an illusion. and the only way to fight it is to make your faith stronger. illusions?! you want to talk about illusions?! if you die tomorrow, you think we're gonna be devastated! but you know what?! we're just gonna go out and buy another dog! and maybe this dog will fetch a stick and bring me my slippers instead of prattling on about the pros and cons of various religions! chris, i think you've had too
Al Jazeera America
Oct 23, 2013 1:30pm EDT
hardware and humanity. this is a show about science, by scientists. let's check out our team of hard core nerds. lindsay moran is an ex-cia operative. tonight she has a real drama, a face transplant that almost ended in death, and an invasion that saved a woman's life. tonight she is in the mountains of california where condors are making a come back, thanks to a simple use of technology. and i'm phil torres, i'm an entomology. i study insects in the rain forest of peru. that's our team, now let's do some science. >> hey, welcome back to anothee changing invasions in science. we are starting today with lindsay. you have incredible touching story of a transformation in a woman. who had a face transplant, tell me the story? >> this was truly a life changing use of technology. she had a full face transplant. here is the procedure. i want to emthat size, this is still very cutting edge. there have only been seven face transplants in the united states. carmen's was the 7th, and there have only been 30 full or partial worldwide. carman took an incredible risk, even having this procedure do
Al Jazeera America
Oct 16, 2013 2:00am EDT
science professor at california state university. he joins us from california. professor thanks so much for being with us, the house republicans failed to even bring a vote tonight. now that the ball is back in the senate's court why should we believe that a viable deal is insight? >> well, like most americans, i guess i want to believe that ideal can be reached. but the real problem is in the house of representatives. what you have got is a small to medium-sized group of republicans who are feeling that they need to stand on principle. and that the principle that they are stands on the ground is number one, to try to modify or delete obama care, but also to try to get spending under control. and typically you think of republicans as being, you know, sort of tied to wall street. but the faction we are talking about here is a faction that doesn't care so much about what wall street wants. and so you know, there may be some pressure as we see the markets shifting, but this group of anywhere from 20 to 40 republicans, isn't necessarily going to be responsive to that. >> do you think this i
CSPAN
Oct 17, 2013 12:00pm EDT
national institutes of health, national science foundation and other catalysts of american innovation and medical progress simply contravenes common sense and our nation's prospects for economic stability going forward. medical progress should be an immutable, american priority. in our polls, commissioned by research america, a majority of american says they would pay more in taxes if they knew that would go forward medical research. that's how important it is to americans. stalling that research now through sequestration or the kind of reform that, again, undermines something we have too long taken for granted while other nations are ramping it up, will drag our nation down at the very moment we have everything it takes to soar. the interest group that policymakers are not listening to, i would argue, is the american public. the words that policymakers are ignoring, at our peril, is our nation's future. thank you. >> we do have time for questions, i just want to make one point which i think is the unifying theme that you hear if this diverse group is people want our leaders to govern
FOX
Oct 20, 2013 7:00am EDT
very, very much. bye, bye. today on "animal science," the siberian tiger is the biggest cat in the world. it takes down large prey with its five-inch long canine teeth. and the american badger's sharks' front claws make it one of the best borrowers. plus, the toad may not look pretty, but it goes through one of the most incredible transformations on earth. will take a look at the most amazing creatures from all parts of the globe. welcome to the fascinating world of "animal science." >> there are three basic types of and armaments in the world. and the land.ky, for most terrestrial animals, traveling from place to place on foot, or on both, is essential for survival. the draft is the tallest land animal on earth. means fastits name walker. with the legs 6 feet long, it doesn't take much effort for the theffe to move across african savanna. flightless birds, like this ostrich, use their strong legs to escape predators and deliver legal kicks. how would you like to get a face full of these feet? not run, they hop, which works quite well. this spring the marsupial can cover 20 feet in
LINKTV
Oct 23, 2013 8:00am PDT
, gang. we do, by experiment, one of the beauties of science is you do by experiment, huh. you don't just do it all in your head. here we go. [makes noise] oh, oh, first of all, i should say this, you guys get the white again. let me put a reflector here. so all this beam energy goes down here, and this beam energy is gonna scatter off here, all right, okay? [makes noise] what color do you guys hear? blue. do you hear blue? you all get it? good. maydell, what color do you hear? white. yeah, she heard white. why did she hear the white? because she's standing right next to the-- that's right, honey-- some, some, filtering. she could have come right at her. it's a good thing you didn't have your eyes there. [laughter] oh, god, no, no, don't. let's get your ear in there. just get your ear, okay? you heard a white. isn't that true? okay. here we go. okay, like that. now, we are at sunset, gang. sunset, uh-huh, all right? air is thicker, huh? what color do you guys hear? blue. white. orange. yellow. [laughter] paul, would you pass out the q-tips? let me remind you, we got, blue, blue, blue
FOX Business
Oct 21, 2013 4:00pm EDT
demand for implied volatility. liz: talking about labor and netflix but let's get some tax. life science and natural resources? their disparate names but is there a common thread? >> it is they're all u.s. companies the multinationals based in the u.s. but they have a major presence overseas. life technologies is a biotech firm to develop a very fast output dna test so you have what was founded in the united states and. 1850 is a huge iron ore producer so it is a big building block with china and brazil and around the road because they have big components. david: thank you very much. thank you all. liz: netflix reports the blockbuster earnings and a stock is jumping. we will pick it apart if subscriber in earnings growth will continue in this quarter and next year. david: is the government's case against jpmorgan won politically motivated? that the department of justice is one used as a political hit man. don't miss that. liz: is jpmorgan paying too high a price for acquiring companies that have toxic mortgage? log on to facebook and let us know. ♪ ♪ [ bell ringing, applause ] five t
FOX
Oct 17, 2013 5:00pm EDT
back, your reactions. >>> but first a truck full of science. how they are giving local students the cool school. that's coming >>> well sometimes the opportunities will knock, but the other times they could drive that right to your front door and that is exactly the case with this week's cool school. mike hydeck shows us how the middle school students, they got to jump on board the semi full of science experiments. >> reporter: standing shoulder to shoulder as they are seeing things for the first time. >> we're going to put this into this. >> reporter: on the normal day, they are not showing you the middle school students and that is what they used in schools. >> and you can get it on into the test tube. and that will be right off the data, you know, for what we have added in and what we are subtracting. >> reporter: as they measure in millimeters, some are sizing up the future as they don't even know it. which is exactly what that tractor trailer is all about. >> reporter: they need to leave those on the bench. >> reporter: as they tour the state of maryland, they will bring in a l
FOX
Oct 23, 2013 6:00am EDT
the designers maxxinistas are scoring. t.j.maxx. my high school science teacher made me what i am today. our science teacher helped us build it. ♪ now i'm a geologist at chevron, and i get to help science teachers. it has four servo motors and a wireless microcontroller. over the last three years we've put nearly 100 million dollars into american education. that's thousands of kids learning to love science. ♪ isn't that cool? and that's pretty cool. ♪ avo: at volkswagen we believe everyone deserves a better car. and that's pretty cool. and now, during the "sign then drive" sales event, you're closer to yours than ever. like the turbocharged tiguan the midsize passat or the 34 highway mpg jetta. and every new 2014 volkswagen comes with no-charge scheduled maintenance... ...all for practically just your signature. the "sign then drive" sales event is back. ...and it's never been easier to get a new volkswagen. get zero due at signing, zero down, zero deposit, and zero first month's payment on any new 2014 volkswagen. hurry, this offer ends october 31st. >>> good morning, every
FOX
Oct 21, 2013 6:00am EDT
and go mobile. suntrust. how can we help you shine today? my high school science teacher made me what i am today. our science teacher helped us build it. ♪ now i'm a geologist at chevron, and i get to help science teachers. it has four servo motors and a wireless microcontroller. over the last three years we've put nearly 100 million dollars into american education. that's thousands of kids learning to love science. ♪ isn't that cool? and that's pretty cool. ♪ >>> florida police are questioning two convicted murderers who forged documents to escape from prison. they walked right out the front gate of the florida prison. authorities want to know who helped them. >>> julie andrews. and a bunch of other stars gathered to honor carol burnt. -- carol burnett. >>> wow does gravity have a strong pull at the box office or what. the drama starring sandra bullock and george clooney was number one for the third straight week. that brings the film's domestic total to $170 million. captain phillips was number three. carry rounded out next with $17 million. >>> the average household spends $4
PBS
Oct 16, 2013 12:00am PDT
film about slavery, o.u have two tavis: it is not rocket science, but it is in the midst of all of that drama and degradation and volatility. it is interesting to see the other characters that are socially redemptive in the way they behave. >> it is just not how it happened. when he is on the boat and his friend is set free, he can turn around to be able to see how he is and say goodbye. it is not about black-and-white. redundance and the situation of america. it is about the history of america. it is pretty important subject matter. also, at the same time, it is a film about love. undeniable love. we are sitting here because we had people survive. that situation for us to have that conversation, this is a story about love. tavis: when you first read this book, what did you make of this man? turn of the page, i was transfixed. that is what he is holding onto. i couldn't believe it. tavis: how did you discover the book? , theyre was this idea came up with the idea that when they got it, i could not believe it. i thought people would notice, but they didn't. she is a world hero. it i
CSPAN
Oct 22, 2013 12:00am EDT
stressed then there's not enough emphasis on vocational training and technical and math and science training. right now i think one of the biggest danger the united states of america is there's no one to replace the baby boomers who are engineers or technicians at this point. i think another pathway to success is get a two-year technical degree or certification. similar to something you see in germany in the last 25 years. it's well-respected. it's seen as press pretentious, and i think we need to do the same thing in america and our economy has to have it. companies have to have the next generation. understand hdac system. understand how to fix things, repair something, innovate something. we're not talking about that. i think we got caught up in a little academic elitism. thinking that everyone had to have a master's degree. the economy doesn't need everyone to have a master's degree. you have to have vocational training. >> we need the "the master" plumbers and electricians. >> i used to tell a story i had a person come in and put wood floors down in the house. he's working the t
Al Jazeera America
Oct 20, 2013 2:00am EDT
explore hardware and humanity in a unique way. this is a show about science by scientists. let's check out our team of hard-core nerds. tonight she's on the front lines of a devastating wildfire as a drone takes command of the skies over yosemite. crystal is a molecular neuroscience. she goes to the streets of seattle and santa cruz for a look at how science might stop crime before it happens. lindsay is an ex-cia operator.
NBC
Oct 21, 2013 11:00am PDT
at luke skywalker's land speeder at the tech museum. it's the "star wars" exhibit where science meets imagination. this was used in the late '70s. what is it exactly? what is underneath that? >> what it is in reality, it's an old english three-wheel car they had taken. you can see the wheels back here. >> reporter: how did they make it look like it was levitating? >> they took mirrors and mounted them at a 45-degree angle. as the car was driving through the desert, the reflection made it look as if it was levitating. >> reporter: all you're seeing is sand on sand. over here is a model of the land speeder. i know you're probably wondering, obi one was the $6 million man? i kid you not, he's here. that's interesting. come over here, pete. this is something that surprised me. darth vader's costume. you see it in the movie. you think, it's so high tech, got all this stuff going on. take a look at it. what are we looking at? just plastic and tape? >> yeah, plastic and tape. in the movie, they highlight it where they have the l.e.d.s lighting up that you saw. this is the first prototype of
CSPAN
Oct 22, 2013 4:00pm EDT
math and science training. right now, i think, unof the biggest challenges of the united states of america there's no no one to replace the baby boomers who are engineering or technicians. in fact, even with a high unemployment rate in our country, there are job openings for welders, there are job owners for mechanics, electricians, and that pay a lot more money than four-year college degrees at this point in time. i think we as a country have mislead young people saying the only way to success is to have a four-year college degree. i think that is a great way to success, but i think another pathway to success is to get a two-year technical degree or certification. very similar to what you see in germany during the last 20/25 years. it's well-respected. it's seen as pregnant -- press pretentious. we need to do the same thing in america and the economy has to have it. the companies have to have the next generation. understand an hdac system. understand how to fix things, repair things, and innovate things. we're not talking about that. i think we got caught up in the little academic
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